"It Was a Great Experience, Let’s Never Do This Again. " an interview with Julie Brigham-Grette, Doug Schnurrenberger and Anders Noren

Let’s say you’ve been involved in a project that has produced over 70 publications. Let’s say that project has spanned half your life. Let’s say you had to cross nations, endure tough conditions and delays, and negotiate a sometimes very...

"The sun is a terrifying and beautiful laboratory of which we know only a little [about]." an interview with Sabrina Savage

Sabrina Savage builds instrumentation for solar physics and studies solar flares at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The technology she helps create delivers the most high-resolution pictures of the sun anyone has ever seen. In a society more dependent upon...

“[Better satellite monitoring] will improve our ability to bridge the gaps between the haves & have nots." interview with Ashutosh Limaye

Through his work with SERVIR, Ashutosh Limaye could be described as one of Earth’s watchdogs. The project scientist at the Marshall Space Flight Center’s job is to take NASA satellite data back down to the Earth and help people use...

"We have a big mess to clean up. There's no other way to say it." an interview with Steven Running

Stephen Running, an Emeritus Regent's Professor at the University of Montana, shares about his work with NASA studying the global ecosystem from space. Trying out a microscope at a young age ironically led him into a lifetime of looking at...

Jennifer Sumner & Kaysen Ford

“It shouldn’t be scary to be who you are." Kaysen Ford, 12, reflects on some of the most important moments in his life with his mother, Jennifer Sumner. Produced by StoryCorps. Originally aired October 26, 2018, on NPR’s Morning Edition.

"We are on a planet that is changing." an interview Steven Platnick

Cloud scientist Steven Platnick is trying to learn how clouds may magnify—or minimize—the effects of climate change. He first got excited about clouds when his Ph.D. advisor, who "treated us like equals," started asking questions about clouds. "He asked questions...

"The sun is the only star that is known to grow vegetables." an interview with Todd Hoeksema

Todd Hoeksema solar physicists and senior research scientist at Stanford University shares his stories about the power of the sun, technology advances and its effects on society and younger generations. (Recorded 7 September 2018)

"As a human being, you shouldn't let the individual days go by without appreciating them." An interview with Justin Kasper.

Justin Kasper is a Professor of Space Sciences at the University of Michigan, where he designs sensors for spacecraft that explore extreme environments in space. In this interview Dr. Kasper talks about what sparked his interest in space, the rewards...

Patrick Kraemer & Tracia Kraemer

We’re used to people baring their souls at StoryCorps, but this is a story about baring quite a bit more. Ten years ago, on Tracia Kraemer’s 40th birthday, she wanted to do something she’d never done before. So she gathered...

"We stand on the shoulders of giants." an interview with Alan Gorchov Negron and Colten Peterson

Alan Gorchov Negron and Colten Petersen, University of Michigan, share their stories of becoming scientists, and their hopes for their continued research and involvement in geosciences. What is the role of an earth scientist? What is the role of climate...

"There were are two paths, figure out how things work or figure out to forecast things." an interview with Paul Stackhouse

Paul Stackhouse is a sun chaser, but in his case it means measuring the surface radiation budget. This means figuring out how much sunlight gets to the surface of the planet, and takes a deep understanding of factors like cloud...

Paru Venkat and Alagappa Rammohan

“When I buy a new book, I don’t start reading the first page. I smell it.” At StoryCorps, we’re used to hearing tales of love. But here’s one of a different sort: a love letter to the written word. Meet...

"Three Generations of Ice Cap Expertise." an interview with Sinead Farrell, Walter Meier, Ellen Buckley and Jackie Richter- Menge

What starts as a conversation about arctic change is actually an all-encompassing discussion about career growth, patience, and personal growth. Walt Meier, National Snow, and Ice Data center, introduces us to Jackie Richter-Menge, US Arctic Research Commission, who has spent...

"Kathy vs. The Volcano" an interview with Katharine Cashman

Kathy Cashman, professor at the University of Bristol, worked on the 1980 eruption at Mount St. Helen’s in Washington, one of the first monitored volcanic eruptions in the world (“it was a ‘who’s who’ of volcanology and geology”). Thanks to...

"You can make the claim that airborne transport of dust gives us rum.” an interview with Hal Maring

Hal Maring once risked his life for a box of fog. The physical scientist at NASA Headquarters was once on a New Zealand research cruise in the Tasman Sea when the vessel hit bad weather. They took down some of...

"I am satisfied by simply being able to help out in whatever way I can." an interview with Claire Parkinson

Dr. Claire Parkinson, senior scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center since 1978, discusses using satellite data to monitor sea ice in the Arctic and Antarctic and serving as project scientist for the NASA satellite Aqua, which makes measurements of...

"One of the most important things that we can do as earth scientists is help society plan for change." an interview with Thomas Wagner

Thomas Wagner, NASA's Program Scientist for the cryosphere, discusses how his life has developed to study the Arctic and Antarctic. Even though as a student he initially found himself bored by studying glaciology, he soon discovered a passion for polar...

"Starting Out in Science Before Your First Birthday." an interview with Nicola Fox

Just a few short months ago, Nicola Fox took over as Director of NASA’s Heliophysics Lab. She’d been prepping for the role a lifetime, however, recounting how she started her scientific career when she was eight months old, thanks to...

"Finding New Ways to Build the Paleo Story." an interview with Melanie Perello

There’s a bit of a culture change moving from Ohio to New Hampshire, which Melanie Perello, Ph.D. candidate at Indiana University, did as part of her studies. Would you be surprised that going from either to Tibet to study paleoclimate...

"Points that fall off the curve are either a mistake or the Nobel Prize." an interview with Glenn Orton

Glenn Orton, a senior research scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, discusses his career exploring the outer Solar System that started with the Pioneer 10 and 11 missions, and extended forward to Cassini and more recently Juno. Interested in space...

“Apollo 11….That's when I said, I don't have to be a businessman, I don't have to go into the military." an interview with Michael Meyer

Michael Meyer, NASA's Chief Scientist for the Mars Exploration Program, talks about his life and work in science. As a teenager working as a deckhand on a treasure diving boat in Florida, he was hired to replace some fired divers...

“We had the spirit of working together” – founding parent of Santa Cruz Waldorf School, Alison (Keeler) Carrillo

Alison (Keeler) Carrillo shares with us her experience of “plunging in” as a founding parent at the Santa Cruz Waldorf School back in the 70s, her 41 year connection to the school, how the parents over the years have made...

"I got a little periodic table wallet card. So, I really am a card-carrying chemist." an interview with Jack Kaye

Jack Kaye, associate director for research at NASA's Earth Science Division, discuss his origins as a chemist and earth scientist, and how he was recruited to Goddard to be a chemist among meteorologists. "My boss would advertise me as his...

"When something changes your understanding, that's why you go into this field." an interview with Brian Day

Brian Day, of NASA’s Solar System Exploration Virtual Institute, leads a group of scientists in visualization and analysis of spacecraft data. Brian was taught that there’s no water on the moon, there’s no atmosphere on the moon, and the moon...