"We have a big mess to clean up. There's no other way to say it." an interview with Steven Running

Stephen Running, an Emeritus Regent's Professor at the University of Montana, shares about his work with NASA studying the global ecosystem from space. Trying out a microscope at a young age ironically led him into a lifetime of looking at...

“We’re really privileged to get to be doing science for a living. That’s a really cool thing.” An Interview with Kelly Fast

Kelly Fast basically works in a sci-fi movie- she works in the Planetary Defense Coordination Office at NASA, which means she finds asteroids before they hit Earth. And while she hasn’t had to deflect any asteroids yet, she’s been involved...

How Sputnik Influenced My Life

I interviewed my father Allen bout what historical event had the greatest impact on his life, he chose the Russian satellite Sputnik.

Grampy’s interesting life

This is a story about my grandpa and his different stories of his life.

“Scientists need to continue… educating the public on risk and uncertainty.” An Interview with Gary Jedlovec

Growing up in Chicago, Gary Jedlovec dreamed of running his own weather station and becoming the next great TV weather forecaster. However, that all changed when he discovered meteorological research. Now well into his career as the Chief of the...

“It's very satisfying to be – even a small cog – in a very important machine.” An Interview with Jeffrey Myers

Jeffrey Myers knows his way around aerial photogrammetry. As a former lead manager at the Airborne Sensor Facility at NASA’s Ames Research Center, Jeffrey’s work with data collection and earth mapping has been affiliated with NASA’s U-2 program, MODIS, and...

Reflections on the first Moon Landing

On May 8th 2019 teens from the MyDurham program interviewed mature adults about their memories of the first Moon Landing in 1969. In this recording we hear about what it was like witnessing the landing as young adults in college...

"We need to figure out how to best manage the planet for all who live here." an interview with Anne Douglass

Nearing the end of her career, Anne Douglass, at NASA Godard Space Flight Center, has provided the scientific community with a better understanding of the ozone layer that protects us all from ultraviolet radiation. Anne describes the energy that it...

"We weigh the ocean and then you can see how much water there is or less water." an interview with Carmen Boening

As a deputy section manager at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab, Carmen Boening is keenly focused on rising with the tide. The trouble is, the water level isn’t going down as the climate warms. Partly through the monitoring of a set...

Larry

Me and my grandma’s fiancé talked about his work in NASA. He worked on the Apollo mission that went to the moon.

"Science is very rarely an individual effort. It takes multiple people to get anything done." An Interview with Noah Petro

Noah Petro is a research scientist at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center- which doesn’t seem like much, but it includes being the lab chief of the Planetary Geology, Geophysics and Geochemistry Lab at Goddard and being the project scientist...

"'Who does science serve?' This is the question I think we should all ask." An interview with Nithin Silvadas.

As a young child in India, Nithin Silvadas picked up Carl Sagan’s Cosmos, and it may have changed his life. From that moment on, he was enraptured with the universe. An undergraduate in engineering (where he literally helped build satellites)...

"There were are two paths, figure out how things work or figure out to forecast things." an interview with Paul Stackhouse

Paul Stackhouse is a sun chaser, but in his case it means measuring the surface radiation budget. This means figuring out how much sunlight gets to the surface of the planet, and takes a deep understanding of factors like cloud...

"We are on a planet that is changing." an interview Steven Platnick

Cloud scientist Steven Platnick is trying to learn how clouds may magnify—or minimize—the effects of climate change. He first got excited about clouds when his Ph.D. advisor, who "treated us like equals," started asking questions about clouds. "He asked questions...

“What gets my juices flowing is connecting the science to an actual mission.” an interview with Brad Doorn

Brad Doorn’s, Water Resources and Agriculture Applied Science Program NASA, work includes forecasting the global food supply, including warnings and predictions about possible problems that might arise due to water supply shortages which can inform global market prices. While the...

“Science isn’t finished until it’s communicated.” An Interview with Mark SubbaRao

As the Scientific Visualization lead for NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Mark SubbaRao oversees the translation of NASA science into images and movies. For Mark, science visualization is a key communication tool that allows the public to interact and explore...

"With satellite data, you can help people understand how the disaster happen in their backyard." an interview with Dalia Kirschbaum

In research, Dalia Kirschbaum literally seeks landslide victories, though in her case this entails finding disasters. The research scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center uses satellite monitoring to get clear predictions about actual landslides through satellite information. “My work...

"If you want to do something, don't let anyone put limitations on you." an interview with Rosaly Lopes

Rosaly Lopes is a planetary geologist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab. She discovered seventy-one new volcanoes on IO, for which she was recognized in the Guinness Book of World Records. She uses her research into the surface of other planets...

"Persistence is necessary to have a career in the sciences." An interview with Laura Iraci.

Dr. Laura Iraci is a research scientist in the Earth Sciences Division at NASA Ames, where she leads a group focusing on air and where human pollution goes. In this interview, we discuss her early interest in high school chemistry...

“Persistence is absolutely critical for both science and NASA.” An Interview with Curt Niebur

Curt Niebur is the Lead Program Scientist for Planetary Flight Programs at NASA Headquarters, which means that he works on all the NASA robotic missions that don’t go to Mars- you know, a very small mom-and-pop operation. We talked to...