Interview with Mom

My mom and I had an in depth discussion about her childhood and her advice for me and the future generations of our family.

Hierarchy of Needs
November 27, 2018 App Interview

Discuss questions of childhood, education, family, and how she wants to be remembered.

“You’re gonna be able to be, and grow into being, the woman that you were born to be.”

Pamela McNeil ’82 and Tracey Cameron, director of Harambee House, talk about Pam’s time growing as an individual and developing enduring friendships at Wellesley.

“I think all-women’s education really is a very good way of addressing [the confidence gap] for many women.”

Ann Damsgaard ’66 and Evelyn Go ’66 met on their first day at Wellesley. They reflect on the advantages of attending Wellesley, including small class sizes and the value of a single sex education.

“I found being in a woman’s college, where you weren’t either competing with men all the time, absolutely wonderful.”

Maud Chaplin ’56 and Ann Roberts ’56 discuss the immediate bond they formed upon first meeting at Wellesley, and reminisce about campus life in the 1950s.

“And I remember opening that box and feeling like my grandmother was there.”

Marah Herbach ’01 and her mother Judith Katz ’66 recall the tangible and intangible connections they made at Wellesley, tying them to generations of Wellesley students.

“Wellesley has given me a sense that I have a purpose and I need to follow it.”

Friends Helen Marshall ’77 and Sally Greenville ’76 define the “Wellesley Effect” as the backbone of the largest supportive community of women in the world.

A Snap of Louise Griffin’s Life

Louise Griffin talks about the ups and downs of her life, and how she overcame obstacles throughout childhood and adult life.

“At Wellesley, every leader was a woman. And so to me, learning that women could do all those leadership roles, was really transformative.”

Deborah Birnbach ’87 and Shannon Langston ’87 discuss the strength behind a group of women, and how Wellesley’s positive environment empowered them in their career choices.

“I look back on what were the things we felt we accomplished the most.”

Lulu Chow Wang ’66 talks with former Wellesley College President Diana Chapman Walsh ’66 about the importance of seeing female role models in positions of power.

“Wellesley prepared me to be fearless.”

Alexa Rice ’11 and her aunt Desiree Rogers ’81 reflect on how their Wellesley experience as women of color prepared them to be bold in every aspect of their life.

There's an "empowering women" vibe. Ask your question. Assert yourself.

Professor Kristina Niovi Jones and Nisreen Abo-Sido ’18 discuss their passion for botany and science. They examine how Wellesley offers a unique environment for women in STEM.

I'm so grateful for you to be coming back to Wellesley.

Marta Rainer ’98 talks with her former teacher, now friend and colleague, Nora Hussey, about their love of theater and their work at Wellesley.

Wellesley affords such a wonderful opportunity to do things we had never done.

Nan Keohane ’61 talks with sister, Geneva Overholser ’70, about how they both got to Wellesley from Arkansas. Each had their own “Wellesley Experience” – finding opportunities they never expected and a new sense of sisterhood they cherish to this...

I think that students want to push themselves.

Professor Stanley Chang talks with his student, Xi Xi ’17, about his passion for mathematics and the innovative ways he gets students excited about math.

It was an opportunity I wouldn’t have had if I hadn’t come to Wellesley.

Professor Bryan Burns talks with Kaylie Cox ’18 about their experiences in Greece working together on the Eastern Boeotia Archaeological Project.

Everywhere I’ve met up with Wellesley women, I think, ‘Ah ha!’

Martha Teichner and Milly Cooper Glimcher reflect on how their experiences at Wellesley fostered their interests and ambitions, and share their thoughts on how Wellesley prepares women to enter the public sphere.

Everyone is unbelievably glad that they went to a single-­sex school. I think it’s had a profound impact on all of us.

Three generations of alumnae—grandmother Katherine Barrett Murphy ’53, mother Georgia Murphy Johnson ’75, and daughter Katherine Johnson ’03—reflect on their experiences at Wellesley, spanning 50 years.

What you need to do in college is broaden your perspective so that you know what kind of person you want to be.

Longtime friends Shirley Young and Marylin Chou talk about how Wellesley taught them to “connect the dots,” and how that skill helped them to succeed in their lives after college.

Your voice was encouraged, and that confidence gained among sisters.

Linda Salzman Gottlieb ’60 speaks with her friend Nicki Newman Tanner ’57 about the frustrations she encountered in regard to sexism after graduation, and how Wellesley prepared both of them to make their voices heard.

This type of relationship – that connection – I think is something special that happens here.

Margo Sulmont ’13 talks with her Wellesley art professor, Daniela Rivera, about how her drawing class helped prepare her for a career in urban planning.